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Going,going,gone... [Bansky-ed]

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  • Going,going,gone... [Bansky-ed]

    Brilliant!! https://www.rollingstone.com/culture...uction-733866/

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    Last edited by Eirene; October 6th, 2018, 12:42 PM. Reason: Edit: Title should read Banksy-ed.

  • #2
    I made this point on Twitter last night... Even if paying $1.3M for a Banksy cartoon is way too much, the buyer ended up with a huge bargain. This was such a brilliant prank that the buyer could eventually resell the frame and the fragments for $10M, if not $50M. Every museum in the world would love to own this.

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    • #3
      This piece has a new title - 'Love Is In The Bin'. https://www.theguardian.com/artandde...ough-with-sale

      I want whatever batteries he is using.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by John View Post
        I made this point on Twitter last night... Even if paying $1.3M for a Banksy cartoon is way too much, the buyer ended up with a huge bargain. This was such a brilliant prank that the buyer could eventually resell the frame and the fragments for $10M, if not $50M. Every museum in the world would love to own this.
        Banksy really made new masterpiece. Waiting for next auction.

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        • #5
          I <3 this one - entitled Morons!

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          • #6
            Banksy’s Girl with Balloon prank was priceless – literally! I wonder if he was having a poke at the art world and its criteria for determining great art. Should great art be defined merely by the famous artist who painted it regardless of the quality of the piece, or the qualities of human being behind the artist?

            As a Fine Arts student exploring avenues of selling and exhibiting my artworks the Banksy story has me wondering how famous do I have to be to sell my work through the large art organisations around the world including Sothesby’s or Christies?

            How do I get as famous as artists like Banksy, Damien Hirst, Yayoi Kusama, or Pablo Picasso. I have read that many famous artist were quite frankly awful human beings. Pablo Picasso used human blood to sign his paintings demanding his family do the honours, he lost two wives to madness, and two to suicide. The famous British painter Walter Sickert was linked to the serial killings of 11 women at Whitechapel in East London, between 1888 and 1891.

            I am wondering what would I have to do to have my art work recognised (of course without having to commit a horrendous crime)?

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            • #7
              My thinking is that you can only be seen as a great artist in the modern era if your work is instantly recognizable. By any member of the general public, not just by connoisseurs. This doesn't apply so much to Renaissance-era painting where the standard of realism is so high and the works were often quite similar, but as I see it by the 19th century almost every great artist had this characteristic.

              Keith Haring, Andy Warhol, Basquiat, Banksy, even realist artists like Andrew Wyeth or Edward Hopper or David Hockney or Maxfield Parrish. Maybe the best example is Vincent van Gogh. If you have this characteristic, there is almost no limit to how famous you can become, potentially, if your work is recognized. If you don't have this characteristic, your career will be a long struggle to differentiate your work from that of from thousands of other artists.

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              • #8
                This resonates! My take-away is that I need to figure out what my "recognisable" actually is. While painting a variety of subjects it is possible to work on technique etc but there comes a point when progression will only come through defining a individual creative inspiration. What represents me?

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                • #9
                  I hate to suggest you limit yourself to one style or one subject matter. At some point there is a risk of becoming a self-parody. But people need a recognizable hook or they won't remember you, they won't make connections between the different works of yours that they see, they won't have a distinctive sense of who "you" are. For me this is one of the few unbreakable rules of the art world.

                  As you can imagine, most artists do experiment and they don't really stick to a rigid formula. Andrew Wyeth did some abstract works, Mondrian(!) painted landscapes, and so on. But even if these works have artistic merit, they are not remembered by critics or the public, and in the marketplace they are much less valuable than an artist's most characteristic works.

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